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Going naked in nature for health

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Going naked in nature for health

Waterfalls are best enjoyed in the nude. I wouldn't say I have always been 100 per cent comfortable with my body, but the decade I lived in Japan certainly released my inhibitions around the female form; bathing nude with women of all shapes and sizes, pubic hair and not, will soon teach you we are all remarkably different and beautiful in our own skin. 

The female body is indeed magnificent. Having observed the changes to my own body over the past eight years since carrying and birthing two children, I am somewhat mind blown at what the female form is capable of. I am certainly not one to obsess over my body, and have chosen out of pure convenience to sway away from wearing makeup almost all of my adult life.

(*Whilst writing this post I popped into the campground toilet block and stumbled upon a young girl no older than 10 years old leaned over the bathroom sinks applying make up. It's 2pm on a Monday during school holidays.)

I have 'life lines' across my forehead and bum; scars of lessons learned, child bearing, and imperfect perfection. My boobs have gone from a decent handful to exploding during child rearing to post-breastfeeding mini cups with 'life-full' nipples.

I have experienced being the only waxed woman in a public bathing house full of pubic hair; I find it so interesting how the Japanese shave their face, arms, backs, and legs, yet find it weird to remove pubic hair, just as intriguing for my Asian friends as to why us westerners enjoy a smooth genital region but let our arm hair grow wild!

The longer I live in a tent, the more I am keen to be naked in nature. Perhaps it's the early swims in the cold lake, or it's those moments spent soaking up the sun on a picnic blanket on the grass outside my tent (both I partake in with bikinis, for the sake of the old caravan travelers with front-row seats to my campsite), but the closer I am to nature the more it has begun to feel unnatural to be layered in clothing.

So when the Leo Monkey and I ventured to local 'secret' waterfalls last week, it was a no brainer that we would get our kits off and immerse our naked selves in nature for a few hours.

With the cascades alive with gushing waters from the weeks of recent rain, and the swimming hole racing with current, the energy transaction of cold, moving water to skin was intense and invigorating. Swimming around the pools naked was an empowering and recharging experience, but I think Remy's cliff jump (and lucky last-minute hand-save of the genitals) was the highlight of the morning.


Aside from feeling free and empowered, being naked is really good for our health. Here are five reasons you should get your kit off more often:

1. Boosts your immune system

Being naked, especially when you are exposing your free body to the sun's rays, increases your body's intake of vitamin D, which is directly related to your immune system. With sufficient levels of vitamin D you are at your optimum for beating off viruses, such as the common house cold and flu.  If you have a nice patch of grass out back, a warm balcony, or know of a local slice of nature that you can enjoy in solitude, then take the opportunity to enjoy some 'clothes-free' time each week.

2. Prevents bacteria growth

As with the rest of your body, your genitals need some time to air out. Vaginas in particular can be prone to bacteria or yeast over growth that can lead to infections. Sleeping naked is a great way to let your vagina breathe instead of having it constantly cloaked in clothing - especially if you are not wearing organic cotton underwear during the days. Sleep naked to help maintain your healthy level of vagina flora.

3. Promotes self-love

Being comfortable with your own skin promotes self-love, something that is profoundly lacking in our modern societies. Getting naked, especially in the outdoors, is a great way to become more comfortable with your body. Take the time to feel yourself, making mental (or vocal) affirmations about the love you have for your body.

4. Encourages self healing

Spending time in the nude is an intimate way to get to know our body and any potential issues or health problems that can arise as symptoms in the skin. What is the correlation to skin problems and physical or mental health? The secret lies in our cells. Biodecoding® is a new way of decoding any type of symptoms (physical, emotional or mental) and resolving their underlying bio-emotional and ancestral cause at the cellular level through a signature methodology. It is a complementary approach to any conventional and alternative treatments, which has the potential to unlock and speed up healing for permanent results.

5. Promotes better sex

High vibes attract high vibes. Feeling confident with your naked self is sexy. Spending time during the daylight hours, especially in nature, with your partner is a great natural way to enhance sexuality and can serve as excellent foreplay. Sex in nature is the ultimate; it is highly erotic and awakens the senses. Just be sure to watch out for unsuspecting insects, snakes, and other unwanted guests when you are getting your groove on in the outdoors.

 

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Ancient volcanoes, and 500 waterfalls

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Ancient volcanoes, and 500 waterfalls

There are over 500 waterfalls in Lamington National Park; we covered three in half a day. If we are falling short of our #100waterfallschallenge goal near the end of the year, we'll hang in the park for a month and cover them all.

This area is oozing with history, and the kids and I soaked it all up on our short 8km adventure along the Main Border Track. Here's what you need to know:

  • The 20,600 hectares Lamington National Park is known for its natural beauty, rainforests, birdlife, ancient trees, waterfalls, walking tracks and mountain views;
  • There are 500 waterfalls;
  • David Attenborough visited and filmed the park while making the 1979 television series Life on Earth in which beech trees and bowerbirds were featured;
  • Lamington National Park is home to one of the most diverse areas of vegetation in the country, including one of the largest upland subtropical rainforest remnants in the world;
  • The roots of the oldest Antarctic beech trees in the park are over 5,000 years old;
  • The park is part of the Shield Volcano Group of the World Heritage Site Gondwana Rainforests of Australia (inscribed in 1986) and added to the Australian National Heritage List in 2007;
  • The plateaus and cliffs in the park are the northern and north western remnants of the huge 23-million-year-old Tweed Volcano, centered around Mount Warning;
  • The mountains in the park are moving. You may not feel it when you are walking through, but evidence is in the valley before you - it is still deepening and widening. It began when the high peak of the extinct volcano attracted heavy rains. Slowly and steadily the trickle of water formed rivulets, and eventually rivers all radiating from the volcano's peak. Valleys were eroded, some deepening to expose cliff-lined gorges between broad plateaus and eroded narrow ridges. Soil creep, landslides and creek erosion still continues today;
  • Elevation in the some areas of the park (south) reaches 1,000m;
  • The Nerang River, Albert River and Coomera River all have their source in Lamington National Park;
  • Aboriginal occupation within the park is suggested to go back some 10,000 years;
  • Soon after European explorers Captain Patrick Logan and Allan Cunningham discovered the area, the timber industry followed including the Lahey family who owned one of Queensland's largest timber mills at the time (1800s);
  • Robert Collins campaigned heavily to protect the forests from logging in the 1890s, but he died before the McPherson Range was protected. Later, Romeo Lahey recognised the value of preserving the forests, and campaigned to make it one of the first protected areas in Queensland;
  • The O'Reillys built their guesthouse in the park in 1926, 'OReilly's Rainforest Retreat', which serves as the starting point for many of the walks within the park;

And the coolest fun fact of all, according to the kids:

  • Marsupial Megafuna (Diprotrodon): weighing in at around 3 tonnes and standing 2m tall at the shoulder, this large, wombat-like marsupial, was widespread across Australia from about 5.3 million years ago, and co-existed with Aboriginal people for thousands of years before becoming extinct. It's believed that a drier climate, longer droughts and changing vegetation, along with being hunted by Aboriginal people, caused the Diprotrodon to die out.

Elabana Falls

The Elabana Falls were the highlight of half-day adventure, and by far the coldest waters I have encountered on our Australian trekking missions this year. When the kids poked their toes in and refused to swim, I knew it was a tad cool. As part of my Wim Hof Method training, I was going in. I lasted around five minutes and felt extreme tightness around my chest and neck; still a rookie in the WHM training but I love observing my body heat up internally as I focus on the inner flame within.

The falls were completely deserted from other humans; tucked deep within the rain forest this is truly a potent spiritual hot spot and my mind imagined early Aboriginals inhabiting these very swimming holes.

Once home the kids were shattered, and jumping into bed that night they exclaimed: "We can't wait to go to school tomorrow! It's such a good rest at school from all the trekking, we just sit around and do nothing."

This got me thinking about my ongoing love/hate relationship with the Australian education system. On the global scheme of things it would seem criminal to complain about the qualities of the Aussie system, but when we don't challenge a system to be the best it can be, aren't we doing an injustice to our kids and future generations?

For us, I'll be continuing to pull my kids out of school for chunks of time, months, each year, taking them traveling around the world to immerse in different landscapes and cultures, ensuring they are exposed to a mix of academic and 'life' education, the latter something I believe is not being taught in our national schools.

 

 

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Mt. Tamborine strike mission and 4/100 in the waterfalls challenge

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Mt. Tamborine strike mission and 4/100 in the waterfalls challenge

For our latest installment of the #100waterfalls challenge, the kids and I were joined by a beautiful couple, Peruvian wife Patti, Australian husband David, who we had met randomly a year ago in a local coffee shop in Lennox Head. Since I first set out to make my documentary Double Barrel, about an oil-dominated surf village in north Peru, Peruvians began to drop out of the sky into my life in Australia. I never had a Peruvian friend before I made the film, now I have a family across the world. Life is so beautiful like that.

Curtis Falls.

Curtis Falls.

Last week Patti reached out on social media, saying her and David had been following our waterfall journeys and would love to come on our next adventure. Early Sunday morning we set out north,  into the luscious rain forests that surround Queensland’s Mt Tamborine. Patti and David met us at the entrance to Curtis Falls - I’ll give away this one as it is well mapped, signed, and even has a boardwalk that prohibits you from entering the swimming hole at the base of the falls.

Experimenting with 360 Insta Nano to capture the feeling of being inside the 'womb' of Mother Nature.

Experimenting with 360 Insta Nano to capture the feeling of being inside the 'womb' of Mother Nature.

We were mesmerized by the trees in the forest as we walked down to the falls. The Curtis Falls Track is nestled within Tamborine National Park, Joalah Section, and protects remnants of Tamorine Mountain's plant communities including areas of rainforest with stunning piccabeen palm groves, tall flooded gums, open forest with bracken fern understorey and woodland. These plant communities provide essential wildlife habitat in a landscape almost entirely surrounded by urban and rural development. Basalt columns, cliffs, rocky outcrops and waterfalls are a lasting legacy of volcanic eruptions 23 million years ago.

Going deeper.

Going deeper.

More laughs, more play.

More laughs, more play.

Basalt and its healing properties

Let's talk about basalt. Until I Googled, I had no idea what a basalt column was, but I had a feeling it was to do with rocks. Here is what I discovered:

"Basalt is an igneous rock that forms from the relatively rapid solidification of basaltic lavas and is one of the most common types of rock in the world. Minerals and trace elements in the ash cloud are extremely beneficial for the planet. The rocks themselves have the basic elements for life including carbon, phosphorous and nitrogen, only requiring water to complete the formula. It is high in silicates, iron, and magnesium.

The fertility of some of the world's richest and most productive farmland is due to the minerals produced by nearby volcanoes.

Basalt and volcanic ash can be used for healing the physical body, remediation of toxic waste, nontoxic ‘enlivened cements’, healing building materials, radiation shielding, etc.

The crystalline structures within basalt can be used for communicators/capacitors. The light emitting from the structures are an avenue for many 'out of the box’ developments - and the microbes within have a world all their own.

The pre-Aztec Pyramid of the Sun outside of New Mexico, is built from volcanic rock and is highly paramagnetic. The Rosetta Stone was made of black basalt.

Basalts are the most productive aquifers of all volcanic rock types.

Rudolph Steiner believed there is rock powders that will pass on the subtle energies received from the cosmic bodies." - Kathleen Smith (Original article).

Full vegan power. In  Divine Goddess Yoga Products  leggings that are the BEST for weekend hikes.

Full vegan power. In Divine Goddess Yoga Products leggings that are the BEST for weekend hikes.

Why thank you Mother Nature for providing us with everything we need to heal and thrive right there! Unable to jump in the swimming hole at the base of the main falls, we trekked deeper into the forest (always going deeper!), and once again struck magic in the form of a high vibrational sheltered swimming hole under the shelter of towering palms. Patti and I stripped down to our bikinis, tip toed into the icy, crystalline water, and reveled in the refreshing pool.

The best free spa you'll ever find is the one nature provides, free.

The best free spa you'll ever find is the one nature provides, free.

At the end of our swim, we circumnavigated the 30minute route back to the carpark, and ventured into Mt Tamborine village for a walk and lunch. There is so much more to see in this area and I feel we barely scratched the surface. Such is the story of every adventure we embark on, and why we won't stop exploring. Patti texted me when we returned home that evening saying it was one of the best days for her and she was so grateful for the experience. Feeling refreshed, revitalized, and rejuvenated.

Recharged.

Recharged.

Wander deep, uncover more.

Wander deep, uncover more.

Don't feel that without financial investment you can't get the R&R you need. I'm all for natural spas and organic treatments, but I think the best ones you can find are out there, under the canopies of towering trees, free for those who dare to go after the experience. And if you can't make it outside for whatever list of reasons, just breathe; you are nature.

Tarzan.

Tarzan.

What is the #100waterfallschallenge?

In case you've missed my earlier posts, after returning home to Australia a month ago following 8 months of global travels, the kids challenged me to take them to 100 waterfalls this year - either at home in Australia, or abroad, and thus began the #100waterfallschallenge (Instagram: @takanamitrouble).

Rooted.

Rooted.

Living Simply for domestic violence awareness

As I write, the kids and I are house-hopping one last time for a couple more weeks before moving into the local caravan park to live in a tent for the year. Our objective with tent life is to promote sustainable living, connection with nature, and to raise awareness for domestic violence. 85% of domestic violence survivors return to their abusers, with many citing financial strain or the fear of a decline in living standards once they leave.

There is a huge lack of funding for domestic violence survivors and the safe houses in our country are appalling, or not available. Despite this, women do not have to feel helpless enough to risk the safety or their lives, and their children's, by returning to abusive environments. I believe that poverty is a state of mind, and that all women have the tools to empower themselves from the inside out. Find out more about how I support the empowerment of women through global trekking expeditions here.

Social Media:

Instagram/Twitter: @theaniccaway

Instagram: Angie @angelahelendavis

Instagram Ryder and Hunter: @takanamitrouble

#100waterfallschallenge

Want to share your waterfall recommendations? Include your comments below.

Peace, love and unity. - Angie xx

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